Thank you for signing up to our email!

Now, before you leave, do you want to make a seal's day?

SoCal Rescue Centers Get Helping Hand

     

The Marine Mammal Center takes in malnourished California sea lions to assist Southern California rehabilitation facilities

sharp scissors, sea lion, marine mammal center
Sharp Scissors,one of the sea lion pups rescued from Southern California and nurtured back to health by The Marine Mammal Center, returns to the ocean at Point Reyes, CA May 24, 2013.
© The Marine Mammal Center

 


The Marine Mammal Center has been assisting in the investigation into the cause of the sea lion strandings. Our senior scientist, Dr. Frances Gulland, along with marine biologist, Lauren Rust, are actively involved in the Unusual Mortality Event Sampling and Pathology Subgroup that is facilitating the diagnostic testing of the sea lion pups to search for any potential cause besides malnutrition. They’ve sent tissues from the first five pups for full histopathology evaluation; swabs from current patients and from pups swabbed at San Nicolas Island last fall for viral testing. Also, Lauren Rust traveled to San Miguel Island in May to help collect blood and swabs from adult female sea lions and premature pups. 

So far there is no evidence of underlying primary infectious disease or toxic insult to suggest what has caused these sea lion pups to strand. The sardine and anchovy fish numbers were extremely low in 2012, and it appears this resulted in female adult sea lions having a difficult time providing enough nourishment to their pups, resulting in the pups being underweight and weaned a month or two early. The pups that survived have been unable to forage adequately and ended up on the beaches extremely emaciated.

Meanwhile, a few of the sea lions taken in from Southern California that our veterinary team and volunteers have been caring for are healthy and back in the ocean including Sharp Scissors, pictured above making his way to the waves!

May 2, 2013

Our Patients Thank You!

sea lion, csl, release, socal, point reyes, marine mammal center
Young sea lion pups go back to the ocean after rehabilitation at The Marine Mammal Center. Point Reyes National Seashore, April 19, 2013.
© The Marine Mammal Center



Thanks to your incredible generousity our patients are gaining weight and, as you can see above, some are even going home! These patients only got a second chance at life because of your support in helping us achieve our $150,000 Dollar-a-Pound campaign goal. Because of committed people like you, we've rescued over 300 animals so far this year. 


Top



April 22, 2013

Watch a recent interview about the sea lion pups in our care, on Discovery News!


April 8, 2013

California sea lions, socal, marine mammal center, malnourished
Young California sea lions at The Marine Mammal Center in Sausalito, CA
© Ingrid Overgard - The Marine Mammal Center



As of this morning, we are providing medical care and nourishment for 165 seals and sea lions - more than double what we would normally have at this time of year! Over the weekend we began the process of taking in additional patients from the Pacific Marine Mammal Center, Santa Barbara Marine Mammal Center, and Fort MacArthur Marine Mammal Care Center in order to free up space at those facilities which are already bursting at the seams with pinniped patients! Additionally, our friends at the Northcoast Marine Mammal Center in Crescent City, CA have taken in a few of our sea lion and Northern fur seal patients, helping to free up some of our valuable hospital space for incoming seals and sea lions that need immediate attention.

Dollar-a-Pound campaign update April 18, 2013:

Thanks to donors like you, we met the $10,000 match from the Waitt Foundation! Your gifts and their match will really help feed our patients, but our work is not done yet. With more animals rescued this year to date than any previous year in our history, we still need your help! We now have 175+ patients onsite (40 more than when we last updated you!) and the harbor seal pupping season is not yet in full swing!

In order to give all of our patients the best chance at surviving in the wild, each animal needs to get bigger and stronger, and as our pups grow so do their appetites! Our hungry pups are eating 4,000 lbs of fish per week and our food bill is now estimated to be $150,000 – double our original estimate because we are projected to have double the number of patients. Double the patients = double the food! Please can you help and give a starving seal a meal?

Help Us Raise $150,000 to Feed Our Patients!

$10 = 1 Fish Smoothie!

Top


April 2, 2013

sea lion, malnourished, socal, bully, marine mammal center
This young sea lion named Bully (foreground) and three of his pen mates, Notebook, Paste, and Principal, were transferred from the Santa Barbara Marine Mammal Center. Currently The Marine Mammal Center is caring for 63 sea lions - more than double the normal number of sea lions on site at this time of year.
© Ingrid Overgard - The Marine Mammal Center




With so many hungry sea lion pups on site it's a challenge to make sure each pup is getting enough to eat. Volunteers and staff are working nearly round the clock to ensure that each of our little, emaciated pups gets enough food. The five animals pictured above, Bully, Notebook, Principal, Paste and Scotty Doo, are all doing well. After a few days of being tube fed fish smoothies, they are already beginning to eat whole fish on their own. This is a critical step in helping these malnourished sea lions get back to the wild. 

Dollar-a-Pound campaign update April 18, 2013:

Thanks to donors like you, we met the $10,000 match from the Waitt Foundation! Your gifts and their match will really help feed our patients, but our work is not done yet. With more animals rescued this year to date than any previous year in our history, we still need your help! We now have 175+ patients onsite (40 more than when we last updated you!) and the harbor seal pupping season is not yet in full swing!

In order to give all of our patients the best chance at surviving in the wild, each animal needs to get bigger and stronger, and as our pups grow so do their appetites! Our hungry pups are eating 4,000 lbs of fish per week and our food bill is now estimated to be $150,000 – double our original estimate because we are projected to have double the number of patients. Double the patients = double the food! Please can you help and give a starving seal a meal?

Help Us Raise $150,000 to Feed Our Patients!

$10 = 1 Fish Smoothie!



 March 30, 2013


Watch video from NBC Nightly News including an interview with Jeff Boehm, executive director at The Marine Mammal Center

Visit NBCNews.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

March 28, 2013

Veterinary staff and volunteers from The Marine Mammal Center (the Center) in Sausalito are providing medical care to approximately 30 malnourished and sick California sea lions that were transferred from inundated Southern California facilities. The transfer also included two northern fur seals, five elephant seals and one harbor seal, which freed up hospital space at the Pacific Marine Mammal Center, Santa Barbara Marine Mammal Center, and Fort MacArthur Marine Mammal Care Center, allowing them to care for more incoming patients.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has declared that “an unusual morbidity event is occurring for California sea lions in Southern California” and estimates that between January 1 and March 24, 2013, more than 900 malnourished and weak sea lions were rescued in the region. By comparison, approximately 100 sea lions were rescued from the region during that same time in 2012.

View photos of the sea lions below:

SoCal Sea Lions Slide 01

The Marine Mammal Center has taken in a large number of malnourished sea lion pups to assist Southern California rehabilitation facilities.

SoCal Sea Lions Slide 02

Patients get ready for transport at The Marine Mammal Center Triage Facility in San Luis Obispo.

SoCal Sea Lions Slide 03

Preparations are underway for the trip north.

SoCal Sea Lions Slide 04

After a long trip, one of many small groups arrives at The Marine Mammal Center!

SoCal Sea Lions Slide 05

The tiny pups look out curiously at their new home.

SoCal Sea Lions Slide 06

Welcome to The Marine Mammal Center!

SoCal Sea Lions Slide 07

Most of the new patients are extremely malnourished.

SoCal Sea Lions Slide 08

As of March 28, 2013, the Center has 100 patients on site.

SoCal Sea Lions Slide 09

The Center will need 60,000 pounds of fish to feed the influx of patients.


“It’s not known with certainty why these sea lions are stranding so malnourished, but biologists’ studies from last spring suggested that this year’s supply of anchovies and sardines could be limited,”
explained Jeff Boehm, executive director at The Marine Mammal Center. “These two species of fish are an extremely important part of California sea lions’ diets and females simply may not have been able to nurse their young sufficiently, resulting in abandonment, premature weaning and subsequent strandings.”

Dollar-a-Pound campaign update April 18, 2013:

Thanks to donors like you, we met the $10,000 match from the Waitt Foundation! Your gifts and their match will really help feed our patients, but our work is not done yet. With more animals rescued this year to date than any previous year in our history, we still need your help! We now have 175+ patients onsite (40 more than when we last updated you!) and the harbor seal pupping season is not yet in full swing!

In order to give all of our patients the best chance at surviving in the wild, each animal needs to get bigger and stronger, and as our pups grow so do their appetites! Our hungry pups are eating 4,000 lbs of fish per week and our food bill is now estimated to be $150,000 – double our original estimate because we are projected to have double the number of patients. Double the patients = double the food! Please can you help and give a starving seal a meal?

Help Us Raise $150,000 to Feed Our Patients!

$10 = 1 Fish Smoothie!


Including the transferred patients, The Marine Mammal Center now has 100 patients on site. This extraordinary event coincides with harbor seal and elephant seal pupping season, which is heaviest from March to May with the Center rescuing approximately 200 malnourished, sick and injured seals during that time. The Center predicts that with the added sea lions from Southern California, the patient count could rise to as many as 200 patients on site at any one time this spring - double the normal patient load.

“Our priority is to always provide the best medical care for all of our patients and get them healthy and back out in the ocean,” explained Dr. Shawn Johnson, director of veterinary science at The Marine Mammal Center.  “We know what it’s like to have large patient numbers here, and we’ll employ what we learned in 2009 when we admitted 1,704 patients – more than double our annual average - to provide efficient, safe and effective animal care.”

Top


Related:

Learn about California sea lions

Learn how you can give these patients a meal through theDollar-a-Pound campaign

Learn about our Leave Seals Be campaign!

 
Printer Friendly
 Click to subscribe to our RSS feed!

Top

 

Summer Time!

Summer Learning at The Marine Mammal Center

Discover!
Summer Learning
Fun Family Run!

Join us for Run for the Seals!

Run!
Run for the Seals, the Marine Mammal Center
Daily Tours!

Come visit the Center during Summer Break!

Sign Up!
Docent-Led Tours